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  1. When we teach evolution to our students, we tend to focus on “constructive” evolution, the processes which lead to the development of novel or modified structures. Most biology students are familiar with the s...

    Authors: Monika Espinasa and Luis Espinasa
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:94
  2. Evidence of detailed brain morphology is illustrated and described for 400-million-year-old fossil skulls and braincases of early vertebrates (placoderm fishes). Their significance is summarized in the context...

    Authors: Gavin C. Young
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:87
  3. The visual organs of insects are known for their impressive evolutionary conservation. Compound eyes built from ommatidia with four cone cells are now accepted to date back to the last common ancestor of insec...

    Authors: Elke K. Buschbeck and Markus Friedrich
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:86
  4. The origin of complex biological structures has long been a subject of interest and debate. Two centuries ago, natural explanations for their occurrence were considered inconceivable. However, 150 years of sci...

    Authors: T. Ryan Gregory
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:76
  5. Cities large and small have a treasure trove of building stones both local as well as imported from various regions of the country as well as foreign sources. Many of them contain fossils which are easily avai...

    Authors: Sidney Horenstein
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:75
  6. The ability to see colors is not universal in the animal kingdom. Those animals that can detect differences in the wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum glean valuable sensory information about their env...

    Authors: Ellen J. Gerl and Molly R. Morris
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:88
  7. In his considerations of “organs of extreme perfection,” Charles Darwin described the evidence that would be necessary to support the evolutionary origin of the eye, namely, demonstration of the existence of “...

    Authors: Trevor D. Lamb, Edward N. Pugh Jr. and Shaun P. Collin
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:91
  8. Despite data and theory from comparative anatomy, embryology, molecular biology, genomics, and evolutionary developmental biology, antievolutionists continue to present the eye as an example of a structure too...

    Authors: Andrew J. Petto and Louise S. Mead
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:82
  9. Anyone who has skimmed a high school biology textbook will be familiar with the iconic examples of homology that seem inseparable from any explanation of the term: the limb structure of four-legged animals, th...

    Authors: Anastasia Thanukos
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:80
  10. For over 100 years, molluscan eyes have been used as an example of convergent evolution and, more recently, as a textbook example of stepwise evolution of a complex lens eye via natural selection. Yet, little ...

    Authors: Jeanne M. Serb and Douglas J. Eernisse
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:84
  11. The occurrence, generality, and causes of large-scale evolutionary trends—directional changes over long periods of time—have been the subject of intensive study and debate in evolutionary science. Large-scale ...

    Authors: T. Ryan Gregory
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:55
  12. Darwin believed that evolution generally occurred through a series of small, gradual changes. This proposal was counter-intuitive to many people because it seemed likely that “transitional” forms would not sur...

    Authors: Deborah A. McLennan
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:53
  13. Many students reject evolutionary theory, whether or not they adequately understand basic evolutionary concepts. We explore the hypothesis that accepting evolution is related to understanding the nature of sci...

    Authors: Tania Lombrozo, Anastasia Thanukos and Michael Weisberg
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:61
  14. Authors: Gregory Eldredge and Niles Eldredge
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:65
  15. A central obstacle to accepting evolution, both among students and the general public, is the idea that evolution is “just a theory,” where “theory” is understood in a pejorative sense as something conjectural...

    Authors: Glenn Branch and Louise S. Mead
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:56
  16. A longstanding debate in evolutionary biology concerns whether species diverge gradually through time or by rapid punctuational bursts at the time of speciation. The theory of punctuated equilibrium states tha...

    Authors: Chris Venditti and Mark Pagel
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:49
  17. This paper critically reviews and characterizes the student's causal-explanatory understanding; this is done as a step toward explicating the problematic of evolution education as it concerns the cognitive dif...

    Authors: Abhijeet Bardapurkar
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:48
  18. The scientific study of evolution in Chile has experienced periods of diversification and stasis, depending upon the social and political context at different times. In the eighteenth century, most of the natu...

    Authors: Rodrigo Medel
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:50
  19. Authors: Niles Eldredge and Greg Eldredge
    Citation: Evolution: Education and Outreach 2008 1:44

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ISSN: 1936-6426 (print)